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Evan Shaw Parker (born 5 April 1944) is a British free-improvising saxophone player from the European free jazz scene.

his solo sax work isn't for the squeamish." and in recent years the influence of cool jazz saxophone players has again become apparent in his music — there are tributes to Warne Marsh and Lee Konitz on Time Will Tell (ECM, 1993) and Chicago Solo (Okkadisk, 1997).

Parker is better known, however, for his later work, which rapidly assimilated the American avantgarde — John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders, Albert Ayler and others — and forged his own, instantly identifiable style.

His music of the 1960s and 1970s involves fluttering, swirling lines that have shape rather than tangible melodic content; sometimes he makes use of pure sound in a manner that recalls Steve Lacy's more radical 1970s recordings or the work of some Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) members.

He began to develop methods of rapidly layering harmonics and false notes to create dense contrapuntal weaves; these involved experiments with plastic reeds, circular breathing and rapid tonguing which initially were so intense that he would find blood dripping onto the floor from the saxophone.

He also became a member of the big band, The Brotherhood of Breath.

Parker has also increasingly become interested in electronics, usually through inviting collaborators such as Phil Wachsmann, Walter Prati, Joel Ryan, Lawrence Casserley or Matthew Wright to electronically process his playing in real time, creating a musical feedback loop or constantly shifting soundscape.and Michael Nyman's "Waltz in F" (1981)), John Stevens, Derek Bailey, Keith Rowe, Joe Mc Phee, Anthony Braxton, Cecil Taylor, John Zorn, Fred Frith, Bill Laswell, Ikue Mori, Thurston Moore, Cyro Baptista, Milford Graves, George Lewis, Tim Berne, Mark Dresser, Dave Holland, Sylvie Courvoisier, and many others.Two key associations have been pianist Alexander von Schlippenbach's trio with Parker and drummer Paul Lovens (documented on recordings such as Pakistani Pomade and Elf Bagatellen) and a trio with bassist Barry Guy and drummer Paul Lytton.Though Parker's central focus is free improvisation, he has also occasionally appeared in more conventional jazz contexts, such as Charlie Watts's big band and Kenny Wheeler's ensembles, and participated in Gavin Bryars's recording After the Requiem, performing the composition "Alaric I or II" as part of a saxophone quartet.He also has appeared in pop-music contexts: on Scott Walker's Climate of Hunter, and on dubesque albums with Jah Wobble, the adventurous drum n bass duo Spring Heel Jack and rock group Spiritualized.He appeared on the b-side to Vic Reeves and The Wonderstuff's UK 1991 number one hit "Dizzy", performing saxophone on "Oh, Mr Songwriter" (based around "Vic Reeves Big Night Out" TV show end theme song).